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            Asked by Allan Heller in Superstitions, Friday the 13th

            Why is Friday the 13th considered an unlucky day?

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            It’s a little murky, but the origin of this superstition probably goes back to the Last Supper attended by Jesus Christ and his 12 disciples the night before his crucifixion on Good Friday. The 13th person has been associated with Judas Iscariot, who betrayed Christ. Additionally, the number 13 is considered “imperfect” when compared to 12, since there are 12 months in a year, 12 days of Christmas, etc. A connection has also been made to King Philip IV of France who arrested (and later executed) hundreds of the Knights Templar on Friday, Oct. 13, 1307.
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            Asked by Anabelle Hand in Vaccinations, History of Science

            Who discovered vaccines and how?

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            There is a history of smallpox inoculation that goes back as far as 1000 AD in China湖北体彩app, Africa, and Turkey. However, the person credited with creating the first vaccine is Edward Jenner, an English scientist who pioneered one for smallpox in 1796. His breakthrough came from taking pus from a blister of someone infected with cowpox and using it to inoculate another person, thus preventing smallpox in that person. He developed this treatment after hypothesizing that dairy workers were rarely, if ever, infected with the deadly smallpox virus because most of them were already infected with cowpox, which has a very mild effect on humans.
            Asked by Rasheed Connelly in Health, Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

            How can you make yourself stop touching your face?

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            If it helps, you’re not the only one. According to a 2015 study, people touch their faces an average of 23 times per hour. That’s a pretty tough habit to break, but doing so could significantly decrease your risk of contracting infections. One of the most common ways for infections to spread is when you touch something, picking up a germ, and then rub your eyes, nose, or mouth. To kick the habit, experts in hand hygiene (which, yes, is a real thing you can be an expert in) suggest changing something in your environment, like wearing something on your hands or face, to make you realize you’re touching your face. If you’re aware you’re doing it, you can train yourself to stop. And if you really need to scratch your nose or something, they suggest covering your hand in a tissue.
            Asked by Elvis Franecki in Exercise, Guinness World Records

            What’s the longest anyone has ever held a plank?

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            George Hood currently holds the record for longest plank at a whopping eight hours, 15 minutes and 15 seconds. So yeah, just a little bit longer than your record. For women, the record is four hours, 19 minutes and 55 seconds, and it was set by Dana Glowacka in 2019. I anticipate your next question is, “How?” because an eight-hour plank sounds pretty impossible. Leading up to his record plank, Hood trained for about seven hours a day, doing 700 push-ups, 2,000 crunches, 500 toe squats, 500 band curls, 30 minutes of cardio, and four to five hours of planking. So, if you’re looking to plank for hours instead of minutes, good luck with that.
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            Asked by Jaylin Konopelski in English Language, English Spelling and Pronunciation

            What’s the difference between “blond” and “blonde”?

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            Remember foreign language classes? The masculine and feminine forms of words? Well, because the word came from French in the 17th century, that’s exactly what we’re dealing with: blonde is the feminine form of the noun, and blond is the masculine form. So, adhering to that rule, a blonde is a woman with fair hair and a blond is a man with fair hair. This seems dumb. It is. Here’s a way around it: Don’t call people their hair color. “Blond” is the more common spelling of the adjective—for example, “that person has blond hair”—and, especially in the United States, can be used to describe anyone’s hair, regardless of their gender.
            Asked by Delia Auer in Women's Rights, Feminism, Holidays and Traditions

            When did International Women’s Day start?

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            International Women’s Day (IWD) was born out of women’s rights activism in the early 20th century. Its roots can be traced back to a 1908 demonstration for women in New York City—15,000 women marched through the streets advocating for better pay and shorter hours in addition to the right to vote. Then, in 1909, National Women’s Day was celebrated for the first time in the U.S. as an extension of these activists’ work. National Women’s Day was observed on the last Sunday of February until 1913, but the first official IWD was held in Austria, Denmark, Germany, and Switzerland on March 19, 1911. It was transferred to March 8 in 1913, and it was celebrated by the United Nations for the first time in 1975.
            Asked by Connor Lakin in Donkeys and Mules, Animal Health

            Why can't mules reproduce?

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            When a female horse and a male donkey mate, you get a mule, but two mules can’t mate to create another mule because of their chromosomal makeup. A mule gets 32 horse chromosomes from its mother and 31 donkey chromosomes from its father. Mules are almost always sterile because those chromosomes don’t match up well enough to create egg or sperm cells. I say “almost always” because there have been a few extremely rare instances of female mules reproducing with a male donkey or horse. But those are so rare they’re often called “miracles,” and there have been no documented instances of a male mule fathering any offspring. So, as far as we know, two mules cannot reproduce.
            Asked by Laverna Senger in Birthdays, Holidays and Traditions

            Is the "Happy Birthday" song still copyrighted?

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            Gone are the days of TV families having to resort to “For He’s a Jolly Good Fellow” around the birthday cake. “Happy Birthday to You” officially became part of the public domain in 2016 after a judge ruled in a lawsuit that music publisher Warner/Chappell didn’t actually own the copyright to the song. The ruling also mandated that Warner/Chappell return $14 million to people who had paid to use the song (a nice birthday present, if a little late). It’s still not completely clear where the song originated or if Warner/Chappell ever actually held the copyright at all, but the prevailing theory is that it was written in 1893 by Patty and Mildred Hill.
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            Asked by Aurelia Stracke in Names and Name Meanings, Nicknames

            If you had to change your name, what would your new name be, and why would you choose it?

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            I would probably go with what my mom was going to originally name me. Autumn Rain. I'd choose it because I like it better than my name now. Because Havyn sounds cool but I like Autumn Rain better.
            Asked by Andreane 湖北体彩appnick in Nintendo, Video Games

            Did blowing into Nintendo cartridges or the game console actually do anything?

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            No, blowing on the cartridges did not help. In fact, Nintendo actually stated in the NES Game Pak Troubleshooting: “Do not blow into your Game Paks or systems. The moisture in your breath can corrode and contaminate the pin connectors.” The reason blowing on the cartridges seemed to work for so many of us was most likely because simply removing and reinserting the cartridge gave it another shot at making a proper connection.
            Asked by Ladarius Brekke in Sanitization and Germs, Health

            Is using hand sanitizer just as good as washing your hands?

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            Not really. Obviously, sanitizer is better than nothing, but washing your hands is preferable in a variety of circumstances.There are certain kinds of germs that sanitizers aren’t great at getting rid of, and many people don’t use them properly (not using enough or wiping it off prematurely, for example). Hand washing is also a better option when your hands are visibly greasy or dirty, and it’s much better at getting rid of harmful chemicals like pesticides.However, hand washing isn’t always convenient, and there are so many cute and good-smelling hand sanitizers in the world, it would be a shame to forsake them entirely. If you use hand sanitizers, you want one with at least 60 percent alcohol for maximum effectiveness.
            Asked by Mandy Johnston in Politics and Government, Presidential Primary

            What is Super Tuesday?

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            Super Tuesday (March 2 this year) is just the name given to the date when the highest number of states hold presidential primary elections. People pay a lot of attention to it because it’s the first big primary day in each election cycle, but it’s not like those states count for extra or anything. This year, it’s even bigger because California, the most populous state, moved its primary from June to be on Super Tuesday as well, meaning more delegates are at stake than ever. The specifics of how important Super Tuesday is depends on the year and the party, but it’s always a day to watch. If you’re looking to participate in Super Tuesday, you can look up when your state holds its primaries here and check if you’re registered to vote here.
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            Asked by Denis Block in Interior Design, HSC Maharashtra Board , Central Board of Secondary Education CBSE

            Why are blueprints blue?

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            The name stems from one of the first practical methods of copying images without simply tracing them by hand. John Herschel invented a way to do it with chemicals in 1842, and the process (called cyanotype) involved turning the paper blue. You would do your drawing on a very thin piece of cloth or paper and lay it over a piece of regular paper that had been soaked in the key chemicals. Then, after being exposed to bright light, the paper would turn blue—except where the drawing was blocking the light from getting to the paper, leaving those lines white. The process was extremely popular until Xerographic copies and computers started to take over, but the name stuck. Now, many blueprints are blue in name only.
            Asked by Savanna Parisian in Literacy, Children's Books

            What was your favorite book growing up?

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            My favorite books were the Percy Jackson series, but I also like the Harry Potter series
            Asked by Rodrigo Schoen in New Zealand, Continents

            What continent is New Zealand on?

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            New Zealand is part of the continent Oceania,and Australasia, believe it or not they both exist at once but dependent on the situation ie;FIFA WORLD CUP,it will be classed as OCEANIA as to allow certain South East Asian countries to join. But....generally it's Australasia for all intents and purposes. I'm luckily a dual national of BRITISH&AUSTRALIAN backgrounds,having been born in England then migrating to Australia at 3 month's old!!! raised in Australia until 14(and Hong Kong for a year at 6,then back to England. So having been lucky enough to have such a "colourful" upbringing I know enough about this topic my brother. ..yo ,bless n peace out 😉✊🙏
            Asked by Lilliana Rogahn in Marine Biology, Fish

            Do fish have personalities?

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            Some research out of the University of Exeter suggests that fish do have personalities behind those blank stares. Tom Houslay and his research team exposed guppies to scary stuff—a fake heron (rather aptly named Grim) and a fake cichlid, a predator fish (they called him Big Al, which I appreciate more than I can put into words). The team recorded the guppies’ responses over several exposures to those scares, and not only did individual fish react differently to the fright, but they did so in the same ways time after time. The researchers thus concluded that the fish have their own, limited sort of personalities—in spite of being raised in the exact same environment, they respond to stimuli in ways that vary from fish to fish.
            Asked by Jacky Farrell in Olympics, Tokyo

            Are they canceling the 湖北体彩app Olympics?

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            No, at least not for now. There is some speculation that this year’s games in Tokyo will be threatened by the coronavirus outbreak. Recently, the longest-serving member of the International Olympic Committee said that if the virus wasn’t in control by late May, a cancelation is a distinct possibility, but that right now, it’s business as usual. A cancelation is more likely than a postponement or a location change because of the sheer scope of the Olympics, but keep in mind that heretofore, they’ve only been canceled because of World War II in 1940 (which, spookily enough, were also set to be in Tokyo). Barring any further catastrophes, the Tokyo games are set to start July 24, 湖北体彩app.
            Asked by Veda Glover in Clouds, Meteorology and Weather

            What is a lenticular cloud?

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            Those are the clouds that look like flying saucers. I love them a lot. They’re usually formed in mountainous environments—the relatively moist air from lower in the atmosphere flows up the mountain and cools down significantly, making it condense into a cloud in that iconic saucer shape. These clouds are somewhat elusive because they’re typically short-lived and localized. As the air moves down the other side of the mountain and sinks lower in the atmosphere, it “dries out,” and the cloud disappears. So now if you see one, you’ll know what it is, but you can still pretend it’s a spaceship. I sure will.